February 5, 2023

Northern parts of Oklahoma are poised for whatever may come their way, although not much snow is expected.| SCHEDULE | Rain, snow expected as OklahomaCity’s winter climate hits, Enid officials said given the climate and hot ground temperatures, they’re not too nervous about Tuesday’s snow possibilities. Still, they’re poised in case the Oklahoma climate throws them a curveball. “Whatever the good Lord brings up here, we’re going to deal with it,” said Mike Honigsberg, emergency administration director for Enid and Garfield County. Dry, hot roads could turn into winter climate chaos in a single day, though northern Oklahoma doesn’t expect that much snow. “In any case, we will be prepared. Right now we’re just watching what’s going to happen,” said Honigsberg. Piles of salt and sand stand tall, ready to get into vans and onto the roads. “We have our rock salt and our mixed and our sand and we have several trucks like that. We have well-trained workers tending to it every winter,” said Scott Morris, assistant metropolitan supervisor at Enid.| MORE | Oklahoma City relies on beet juice to deal with slick roads. Shifts are set and crews are ready to see what they bring. “We have two different shifts, each lasting twelve hours tomorrow, which can be adjusted if the weather decides to do something differently,” Morris said. While Enid and Northern Oklahoma couldn’t have had as much snow as other areas, they are willing to step out and help those who want it.” I think their biggest thing is bridges, overpasses, in cases like that the biggest part of the problem would be if it occurs,” said Honigsberg.

The northern parts of Oklahoma are geared up for anything, although not much snow is expected.

| SCHEDULE | Rain, snow expected as winter weather moves to Oklahoma

City officials in Enid said with this climate and hot ground temperatures, they are not too nervous about Tuesday’s snow possibilities. Still, they’re ready if the Oklahoma climate throws them a curveball.

“Whatever the good Lord brings up here, we’re going to deal with it,” said Mike Honigsberg, emergency administration director for Enid and Garfield County.

Dry, hot roads could turn into winter climate chaos in a single day, though northern Oklahoma doesn’t expect that much snow.

“In any case, we will be prepared. Right now we’re just watching what’s going to happen,” said Honigsberg.

Piles of salt and sand stand tall, ready to infiltrate vans and the streets.

“We have our rock salt and our mix and our sand and we have several trucks like this. We have well-trained workers tending to it every winter,” said Scott Morris, associate metro manager at Enid.

| MORE | Oklahoma City uses beet juice to treat slippery streets

Shifts are set and crews are ready to see what’s owed them.

“We have two different shifts, each lasting 12 hours tomorrow, which can be adjusted if the weather does something differently,” Morris said.

While Enid and Northern Oklahoma might not have had as much snow as other areas, they are willing to step out and help those who want it.

“I think their biggest thing is, you know, bridges, overpasses, that sort of thing would be the biggest part of the problem if it happened,” Honigsberg said.

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